When dogs have slimy poop, dog owners are often disgusted. Nobody wants to pick up a pile of slimy poop, but when a dog develops slimy poop, there's more than a mess to consider.

Fact is, normal poop in dogs shouldn't be slimy. Rather, the ideal dog stool should be solid and easy to pick up, ideally without leaving any mess behind. 

 If you therefore notice slimy poop in your dog, your best option is to keep an eye on your dog and consult with your vet if the symptoms of slimy poop seem to persist.

A Matter of Mucus

What makes your dog's poop slimy? Most likely, it's the presence of mucus. The mucus may appear as having a jelly-like consistency or it can be enveloping the dog's stool almost like a sausage casing. 

Mucus is normally present in a dog's stool as the colon produces it to help the stools pass along, but when there's a lot of mucus, this is often a sign that the colon in inflamed, explains veterinarian Dr. Fiona. 

If you never noticed mucus in your dog's stool and now your dog's poop suddenly appears slimy, there are chances that your dog's colon has been producing excessive amounts and isn't happy.

Slimy poop in dogs is not normal and requires investigation, especially if it persists. 

Slimy poop in dogs is not normal and requires investigation, especially if it persists. 

A Case of Colitis

While mucus is just a symptom of something going on with the colon, one of the most common conditions known for causing slimy poop in dogs is colitis, the medical term for the inflammation of the colon, the large intestine.

 Often, the stools start coming out soft, sort of the consistency of pudding, and then at the end they turn gelatinous and slimy.

On top of developing slimy stools, an inflamed colon may also develop erosions which may cause the appearance of blood in the dog's stool. 

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Colitis may have several causes such as stress, parasites, bacterial infections and dietary indiscretions.

Did you know? Colitis is the cause of over half of all cases of chronic diarrhea in dogs, explains veterinarian Dr. Ivana Crnec. 

Submit a Fecal

Because slimy poop can be indicative of parasites and bacterial infections, it's a good idea to see the vet and have your vet run a fecal test on your dog. 

Collecting a stool sample is fairly easy. All you need is a small amount, 1 inch long should suffix. 

Make sure it's fresh, not older than 24 hours and that it's stored in a clean container with as tight-fitting lid, such a margarine tub, suggest veterinary pathologist Dr. Kristiina Ruotsalo and Margo S. Tant in an article for VCA Animal Hospitals.

Calm it Down

For mild cases of colitis, such as colitis caused by temporary stress or an abrupt dietary change, home remedies can be tried. Veterinarian Dr. Jay Mawhinney suggests fasting the dog for 12 hours and then offering 3 parts boiled rice with 1 part boiled chicken in small amounts about 3 to 4 times a day.

 A veterinarian though should be sought at once if the dog develops increased blood in the stool, more diarrhea or other symptoms.

Sometimes, the diarrhea persists and and a secondary bacterial infection can set in. These cases may require a course of antibiotics. 

In the long-run, if your dog is prone to bouts of colitis, the key to addressing the problem is determining the underlying cause. 

Did you know? Just as people, dogs can also develop inflammatory bowel disease and sometimes the exact cause remains unknown.

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